Write Your Heart Out

 

 

 


 

I developed this class in 2003 working with my colleague, P.W. "Peg" Woods, Ph.D., Co-Director of the University of Massachusetts Writing Program. We have taught in libraries and community centers, offering instruction to individuals interested in learning to write fiction or literary non-fiction.  Today, I use music and visual imagery (including my own paintings) to stimulate writers' imaginations.  A popular class, it can be tailored to fit individual needs, and it can be scheduled in a variety of ways: as a day-long or half-day program, or as a series of classes held over a period of four to six weeks. A minimum enrollment of four students is necessary for this class.

 

 

Write Yourself Anew

 A new class, this is offered to groups interested in using a variety of meditative exercises and simple yoga postures to stimulate writing of all kinds. This class is popular for its spiritual dimension and is perfect for retreats of all kinds, and for yoga studios interested in broadening their offerings. Again, the class can be scheduled to fit the needs of the students.

 

Torah Matters

I designed this class specifically for my temple, Hevreh of Southern Berkshire, in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. We use scripture to stimulate personal writing. A version of this class is available for any interested church group.

 

Riverbrook Writing 

The Riverbrook Writing Group meets every Thursday afternoon at a home for women with developmental disabilities, located in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. Designed to give  participants a chance to express their thoughts and feelings, writers are encouraged to unleash their imaginations in serious and light-hearted words and in visual images, including photography and video. Organized in the spring of 2014, the workshop encourages women with disabilities to explore topics close to their hearts. Where a woman is unable to write on her own, scribes capture her words and feelings. I would be delighted to design a class that caters specifically to writers who are disabled, or to any other group that might need special arrangements or attention.